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7 takeaways from Mark Zuckerberg's appearance before the House

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The European Union on Wednesday thanked Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg for highlighting the bloc's tough new data protection rules after he said the social media giant planned to follow them during grilling by United States lawmakers.

And Democrats expressed concerns about the inflammatory stories that were published on the platform by the Internet Research Agency, a private company with Kremlin ties.

"How can someone control keeping the content within the realm they want it to without being collected?"

"It is inevitable that there will need to be some regulation" of internet firms, Zuckerberg said on Wednesday, but he again steered away from any specifics.

In 2016, political firm Cambridge Analytica, working on behalf of President Trump's campaign, gathered the personal information of 87 million Facebook users.

Mark Zuckerberg has had an interesting couple of days as he faces questioning from United States senators regarding digital privacy following the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

He also said he was not familiar with what various media reports call "shadow profiles", collections of data assembled on Facebook users that they have no knowledge of or control over.

Three senators introduced privacy legislation on Tuesday that would require users' permission to collect and share their data.

Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg told NBC News on Thursday that Facebook users could have to pay to completely opt out of their data being used to target them with advertising. I performed a simple five-minute browsing test last week that included visits to various sites - but not Facebook.

Ali Mogharabi: CEO and co-founder of Facebook Mark Zuckerberg testified in front of Congress yesterday and answered questions about the latest data breach issue that involved Cambridge Analytica.

But when asked if his data had been improperly used he replied: "Yes" and gave no further details.

Mr Zuckerberg, who, at 33, runs a multi-billion-dollar company with some two billion users, accepted personal responsibility for the leak of users' data and vowed that the company will do better in guarding such information.

Zuckerberg faced questions about the future of his company.

Lauren Davis, an employee at Virginia Mason, isn't sure how she feels about Facebook's user data scandals.

Facebook shares closed up 1.2 percent on Wednesday after dips earlier in the day.

Many people couldn't believe that USA lawmakers who regulate technology have such a loose grasp on how things work.

It was the first of two marathon hearings; the second will be before the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Mark Zuckerberg said, "I think it's pretty much impossible". One said information was likely shared after a friend logged in and another said they were not affected.

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